Tag Archives: Horses

Art of the Horse – Painting Workshop

Joan doing a demo at last year's Art of the Horse painting workshop

May 11, 12, & 13, 2012 ($375, accommodation and all meals included!)

Back by popular demand – an Art of the Horse painting workshop with Joan Larson at Twincreeks!

Joan offers her years’ of professional expertise as one of the top equine artists in North America. Her most recent bodies of work include the “RCMP Musical Ride” and “Wild Horses of Sable Island.”

This is a 2.5 day, in-residence, workshop including live observation and sketching lessons as well as studio work. All levels of experience are welcome – everyone learns something. Joan will demo in pastel, however you are more than welcome to bring the painting medium of your choice since she is well versed in many mediums.

Itinerary: (Full itinerary upon request)

  • Friday Evening: demo, snacks and “get to know each other”
  • Saturday & Sunday: Full day painting with potential for evening ride.

Participants can expect:

  • Demos each day
  • Plenty of individual attention tailored to your specific concerns
  • Hands on drawing from live subjects (using the guest ranch horses)
  • Equine anatomy for artists
  • Interpreting your photo reference and how to use it for painting
  • Discussions about Composition & Design, Colour Theory, Colour Mixing, Contrast and other related issues
HORSES WELCOME – at no extra charge!

For info about bookings, horses, and location contact Deborah Flinn at 250-746-8769 or Email at twincreeks@shaw.ca

For specific info about workshop & painting contact Joan Larson at 250-752-0395 or Email at joan@joanlarson.com

To see photos from last years workshop click here


Creekside Christmas Sale!

It’s that time of year again…winter holidays are almost upon us and of course with this time of year also comes the stress of buying a ‘perfect’ gift for the special people in our lives.

In an effort to diffuse that shopping stress we’ve got something special this year JUST for our online fans. We’ve ramped up our annual Creekside Studio Christmas Sale so this year you can save big!

For every $50 you spend, you receive $25 in free credit towards more product or framing costs!

*This Sale is limited to prints and products we have in stock
*Price does not include tax and shipping

These pieces are just a sample of what we currently have in stock, however if you would like to see all of the product we have available just head to our website: joanlarson.com

**NOTE**

The shopping cart on our website will not be reflecting this sale (since our shopping cart isn’t that smart). Please email us directly at: joan@joanlarson.com or phone the Studio at (250) 752-0395 for a custom quote. Payments accepted via PayPal or credit card.

Cheers and Happy Holidays!


Larson unveils Sable Island series in Coombs

After the initial Sable Island show at the studio on the 18th and 19th of June, Pamela Smyth, from the Oceanside Star came by the Studio and then wrote this article in the local paper. Thanks so much Pamela!

(One quick note: at the bottom of the article it says the show is only open until July 3rd…but we’ve extended the show: “The Wild Horses of Sable Island” will be open daily at Creekside Studio from 1 – 5 p.m. or by appointment through the summer months.  Closed Mondays)

 

Larson Unveils Sable Island Series in Coombs– Pamela Smyth, Special to the Oceanside Star

Nova Scotia island of shipwrecks also harbours 400 horses

By Pamela Suzanne Smyth, Special to Oceanside Star

Published: Thursday, June 23, 2011

Joan Larson unveiled her Sable Island series at the Creekside Studio in Combs last weekend.

The series follows her equestrian-themed Musical Ride series, released earlier this year.

In 2009, Larson’s passion for horses drew her to the island off Nova Scotia’s southeast coast and home to over 350 shipwrecks and 400 free-roaming feral horses.

The nomadic animals may be the descendants of those left on the island by a British merchant after being confiscated from Acadians by opposing forces. However, given the number of shipwrecks dating from the 1500s, along with former human settlement attempts, theories vary.

By the end of the 16th century, the island, comprising sand, low-growth vegetation and freshwater ponds, is said to have been inhabited by shipwreck survivors, sealers and salvagers.

Since then, horses were periodically removed, mainly for commercial use, but in 1960, the government implemented protection policies.

Once Larson was granted access to the protected historical site, she took a hotel in Halifax and, with three others, shared the $10,000 cost of hiring a charter plane.

“You fly in at the mercy of the weather,” Larson says. “Before we came, there had been six weeks of steady fog. Those booked before us never made it and had to cancel their plans.”

Her planned five-day visit was shortened to two days.

The island, populated by a half-dozen people, has no stores or restaurants. Before landing, a Coast Guard member packed the landing strip. “He drove his truck over it about 20 times,” says Larson.

“There were two buildings open and we stayed in the one for visitors. We had to bring our own bedding and food.”

After settling in, she wandered off on her own. “Standing by a pond, I saw a stallion with his harem. He moved away and fell knee-deep in quicksand. Taking pictures, I sunk in about three inches, then pulled out and backed away. He broke free. Maintaining a distance, I wanted to touch his hair. He came up and sniffed me. I lifted up his long mane and scratched his neck and he loved it. ”

The next day, touring the ponds with a visiting doctor from the University of Alberta, the stallion returned. “This time, he nestled up against me and tried to separate us.”

The doctor teased that the horse wanted the artist to join his harem. Found in several paintings, she calls the four-legged fellow ‘Boyfriend.’

Another memorable experience occurred when a younger stallion approached the camera’s tripod. Cautiously investigating the device, he nudged it a few times and finally sent it to the bottom of the pond.

The Sable Island exhibit can be viewed at Creekside Studio until July 3. You can call the studio toll-free at 1- (800) 251-9246.


Contest Closed

Unnamed...but not for much longer!

“Name the Painting” Contest Closed

Our contest is now closed for entries but Wow, you people have been incredible!!!  Thank you to everyone that has taken the time to send in your entry.  I am overwhelmed and humbled by your responses.

There have been 257 names entered . . . and I can only pick one.  But let me tell you what has happened because of this . . . some of the names suit the other paintings in the series and some of the names have actually sparked new paintings in my head!!

This entire “Sable Island” series is just getting started.   I have just spent the last 2 days (at our opening here at the studio) talking non-stop about Sable Island.  The stories and aura of this magic island and its horses have completely captivated me.  20 paintings is a good start!

SO, if you would like to suggest titles for any of the other paintings, please feel welcome to do so.  I may not be able to email each of you personally to thank you, but please know that I appreciate each and every suggestion.  I believe that “TIME” is the only thing any of us really ever have to spend, so I most humbly thank you for your time and consideration.

The winner of this contest will be posted later today.  Thank you.


Wild Horses Couldn’t Drag Her Away

PQ News reporter Lissa Alexander wrote and wonderful article in the local paper about my trip to Sable Island and about my upcoming show at the Studio this weekend!

Thanks so much Lissa, it’s a beautiful article!

“Wild Horses Couldn’t Drag Her Away” – Parksville Qualicum Beach News – Lifestyles

 

By Lissa Alexander – Parksville Qualicum Beach News
Published: June 14, 2011 9:00 AM

Boys Will Be Boys

After a profound visit two years ago to a secluded, East Coast Island, Coombs artist Joan Larson has finished her Wild Horses of Sable Island series, enabling residents to discover this hidden Canadian gem for themselves.

Larson had known about the ethereal sand bar island since she was a child; heard the romantic stories of the wild horses, the sandy plains and beaches and spectacular sunsets, but never thought it would be possible to visit herself.

Access to the island has to be granted by Canadian Coast Guard and visitors have to make their own transportation arrangements to and from the island, as well as bring all their own supplies.

Larson was invited by a childhood horse riding acquaintance, and was thrilled by the invitation.

“It was just like, ‘Oh my God are you kidding?’ when she asked if wanted to go,” Larson said.

“To go and hang out with a bunch of wild horses?” she added.

So she headed off with two photographers and an Alberta professor and wild horse researcher. The island, located 300 kilometres southeast of mainland Nova Scotia, is the windiest place in Nova Scotia with the least sunshine and most fog. That’s why it wasn’t surprising to Larson when she and her group were grounded by offshore fog, delaying their week-long trip for five days. In the end the weather also delayed them getting back to the mainland, giving them four full days on the island.

Before the wheels even hit the landing strip (which was the beach) Larson saw wild horses coming out of the dunes. The population of horses on the island swelled to about 400 when she was visiting and she said it wasn’t hard to find them on the 42 km long island.

Only a handful of people reside on Sable Island, but the wildlife is a different story. Besides wild horses, the island is also home to the world’s largest population of grey seals, along with harbour seals and numerous birds.

One evening that remains ingrained in Larson’s memory was the first night she spent on the island, having hiked to a beach to watch an incredible sunset on a balmy summer’s day.

“I was sitting in the sand dunes and there’s horses behind me, there’s seals up and down the beach and I just had this profound sense like the universe came down and gave me great big hug,” she said.

Larson has created 20 original paintings based on her experiences on Sable Island, revealing captivating scenes of the island’s wild horses, sand dunes and sunsets, all in pastel. She said the Island was a magical place and she wanted to capture and express this in her work.

“To me this is about sharing a little slice of Canada that hardly anyone will get to go visit in person,” she said.

The Wild Horses of Sable Island will be featured in an art exhibition and sale at the Creekside Studio, located at 1471 Winchester Rd. in Coombs this Saturday and Sunday, June 18 and 19 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For details about the artwork and show visit  www.joanlarson.com/sableisland.html or call 250-752-0395.

A “Name That Painting” contest is happening for one of the pieces, visit https://joanlarson.wordpress.com/contest/ for more information.